Category Archives: citizen librarians

Sharing journals freely online

What are all the research journals that anyone can read freely online?  The answer is harder to determine than you might think.  Most research library catalogs can be searched for online serials (here’s what Penn Libraries gives access to, for … Continue reading

Posted in citizen librarians, copyright, discovery, libraries, open access, serials, sharing | 2 Comments

From Wikipedia to our libraries

I’ve heard the lament in more than one library discussion over the years.  “People aren’t coming to our library like they should,” librarians have told me.  “We’ve got a rich collection, and we’ve expended lots of resources on an online … Continue reading

Posted in citizen librarians, discovery, libraries, online books, subjects | 24 Comments

Building on a full complement of copyright records

Thanks to recent efforts of the US Copyright Office, we now have a complete digitization of summary copyright registration and renewal records back to the late 19th century.  As Mike Burke and others at the Copyright Office have been reporting … Continue reading

Posted in citizen librarians, copyright, open access, sharing | 1 Comment

A digital public library we still need, and could build now

It’s been more than half a year since the Digital Public Library of America project was formally launched, and I’m still trying to figure out what the project organizers really want it to be.  The idea of “a digital library … Continue reading

Posted in citizen librarians, copyright, libraries, people, sharing | 11 Comments

Book People postscript

This past Friday I closed down the Book People mailing list, a forum for people making and reading free online books that Mary and I started in 1997. Much of the activity of folks on the list would be early … Continue reading

Posted in citizen librarians, meta, online books

What’s this all about, Part 2: Everybody’s Libraries

In my previous post, I discussed “citizen librarianship” and the rise of online library services that go beyond the established library organizations and practices. And I claimed that the most promising future of libraries involved understanding and building up “everybody’s … Continue reading

Posted in citizen librarians, meta | 3 Comments